The Voices. Talking Dirty.

voiceGive The Sloth a daft premise and we’re all over it like a cheap suit. So The Voices could have been written with us in mind. It features a talking dog – yes please. A psychopathic cat – like it. And a delusional serial killer – could it get any better? Let’s find out.

Jerry (Ryan Reynolds) is a factory worker.  On the surface he’s sweet and earnest, singing irritatingly cheerful songs  on the production line and contributing ideas for the office Christmas party. But all is not entirely well in Jerry’s world, for Jerry is not entirely well. In fact he’s seeing a psychiatrist and is delusional, convinced his pet dog Bosco and cat Mr Whiskers (both voiced by Ryan) are talking to him. Bosco, in the manner of dogs the world over, is dopey, loving and supportive. Mr Whiskers, in the manner of cats the world over, is evil, vindictive and fond of rude turns of phrase involving back passages. And randomly speaks with a (slightly ropey) Scottish accent.

Fighting these virtual extensions of his good and bad conscience, Jerry unfortunately finds Mr Whiskers becoming more persuasive. Particularly unfortunate for Fiona (Gemma Arterton) the office hottie and distant object of Jerry’s affections. Chancing upon Fiona alone one night, one thing leads to another and Jerry, completely unintentionally, stabs her to death. Oops.  But that’s OK for he salvages her head, stores it in the fridge and lo and behold, Fiona’s head starts talking to him too, demanding Jerry kill again to provide her with a fridge-friend. Can Jerry resist the voices’ demands?.

The Voices is dark. Very dark and often very funny, shot through with a large dose of Little Shop Of Horrors style surreal kitsch and hitting just the right, slightly ‘off’ tone. The Sloths’ good, liberal, Guardian-reading left wing conscience felt bad laughing at the antics of the hapless and naively endearing Jerry. But then our evil, hedonistic, vodka and tonic swilling bad conscience told us to get a ****ing life and stop being so anally uptight. Leave your good conscience at home and enjoy.

UK release 20 March

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